Function part 8 (Overloading Function)

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Function overloading is a feature of C++ that allows you to have two or more functions with the same name, as long as they have different parameters. This can be useful when you want to have a single function that can perform different tasks, depending on the type of data that is passed to it as an argument.

For example, this code is a set of three C++ functions that print different types of data to the console.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void print(int a)
{
    cout << "Integer = " << a << endl;
}
void print(float a)
{
    cout << "Float = " << a << endl;
}
void print(char c)
{
    cout << "Character = " << c << endl;
}

int main()
{
    print(1);
    print('a');
    return 0;
}

The first function, print(int a), takes an integer as an argument and prints it to the console with the prefix “Integer = “.

The second function, print(float a), takes a floating-point number as an argument and prints it to the console with the prefix “Float = “.

The third function, print(char c), takes a character as an argument and prints it to the console with the prefix “Character = “.

Output:

Integer = 1
Character = a

 

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Function part 8 (Overloading Function)

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